14 Characteristic Studies
by Jean-Baptiste Arban
Cornet - Sheet Music

Item Number: 4418603
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Instructionals
Chamber Music Cornet, Trumpet

SKU: CF.W2527

Composed by Jean-Baptiste Arban. Edited by Jennifer Marotta Thomas Hooten. SWS. Classical. Softcover. With Standard notation. 32 pages. Carl Fischer Music #W2527. Published by Carl Fischer Music (CF.W2527).

ISBN 9780825820281. UPC: 798408020286. 9 X 12 inches. Key: C major.

The following fourteen studies have been specifically written to provide the student with suitable material with which to test his powers of endurance. In taking up these studies, he will doubtless be fatigued, especially at the outset, by those numbers requiring an unusual length of breath. However, through careful study *and experience he will learn to overcome the difficulties and will acquire the resources which will enable him to master this particular phase of playing with ease. As a means to this end, attention is drawn to cantabile passages in particular. which should be played with the utmost expression, yet at the same time with as much modified tone as possible. On the cornet, as with the voice, clear tones may be obtained by widening the lips, and veiled tones by contracting them. This happy circumstance allows the performer an opportunity to rest while still continuing to play, and at the same time enables him to introduce effective contrasts into the execution. It should be noted that by little artifices of this kind, and by skillfully conserving his resources, the player will reach the end of the longest and most fatiguing morceau, not only without difficulty, but even with a reserve of strength and power, which, when brought to bear on the final measures of a performance, never fails to impress an audience.
The following fourteen studies have been specifically written to provide the student with suitable material with which to test his powers of endurance. In taking up these studies, he will doubtless be fatigued, especially at the outset, by those numbers requiring an unusual length of breath. However, through careful study A*and experience he will learn to overcome the difficulties and will acquire the resources which will enable him to master this particular phase of playing with ease. As a means to this end, attention is drawn to cantabile passages in particular. which should be played with the utmost expression, yet at the same time with as much modified tone as possible. On the cornet, as with the voice, clear tones may be obtained by widening the lips, and veiled tones by contracting them. This happy circumstance allows the performer an opportunity to rest while still continuing to play, and at the same time enables him to introduce effective contrasts into the execution. It should be noted that by little artifices of this kind, and by skillfully conserving his resources, the player will reach the end of the longest and most fatiguing morceau, not only without difficulty, but even with a reserve of strength and power, which, when brought to bear on the final measures of a performance, never fails to impress an audience.
The following fourteen studies have been specifically written to provide thestudent with suitable material with which to test his powers of endurance. In takingup these studies, he will doubtless be fatigued, especially at the outset, by thosenumbers requiring an unusual length of breath. However, through careful study ·andexperience he will learn to overcome the difficulties and will acquire the resourceswhich will enable him to master this particular phase of playing with ease. As a meansto this end, attention is drawn to cantabile passages in particular. which should beplayed with the utmost expression, yet at the same time with as much modified toneas possible. On the cornet, as with the voice, clear tones may be obtained by wideningthe lips, and veiled tones by contracting them. This happy circumstance allows theperformer an opportunity to rest while still continuing to play, and at the same timeenables him to introduce effective contrasts into the execution. It should be notedthat by little artifices of this kind, and by skillfully conserving his resources, theplayer will reach the end of the longest and most fatiguing morceau, not only withoutdifficulty, but even with a reserve of strength and power, which, when broughtto bear on the final measures of a performance, never fails to impress an audience.