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18456650
18456650
18456650

Violoncello Concerto in Bb major Wq 171

Urtext

By Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach

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Cello and piano
Urtext. Composed by Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (1714-1788). Edited by Ulrich Leisinger. Arranged by Ulrich Leisinger. This edition: piano reduction. Solo concerto. Edition Breitkopf. The concertos in A minor and B flat major were first written as violoncello concertos between 1750 and 1753. They thus rank among the very first concertos for solo cello in Germany. Early classical. Piano reduction. Breitkopf and Haertel #EB 8783. Published by Breitkopf and Haertel (BR.EB-8783).

Item Number: BR.EB-8783

ISBN 979-0-004-18257-4. 9 x 12 in inches.

The concertos in A minor, B flat major and A major were first written as violoncello concertos between 1750 and 1753. They thus rank among the very first concertos for solo cello in Germany. The A minor Concerto, composed in 1750, is performed quite frequently today. C. P. E. Bach most likely wrote the Concerto in B flat major Wq. 171 as the last of the little work group in 1753 in Potsdam, at the court of King Frederick the Great. He reworked the composition for flute and harpsichord shortly thereafter. Various sources prove that copies of the work had made it known quite extensively in the second half of the 18th century. In his new Urtext edition, Ulrich Leisinger bases himself on two reliable manuscripts. All conducting scores and orchestral parts are thus obtainable exclusively from Breitkopf & Hartel. The study scores (,,Studien-Editionen) remain within the G. Henle Verlag and can be ordered there.

We are pleased to be able to offer a performing version of the Urtext that has been edited by Klaus Kropfinger from sources found in a state that is typical of Beethoven: no autograph but various sources bearing corrections by the composer.

The autograph of the ballet music to The Creatures of Prometheus for instance has not come down to us. Julius Rietz the editor of the first Beethoven Complete Edition was only able to consult the copy of the score in the Haslinger-Rudolfinische Collection which due to the standardizing tendency identifiable in its calligraphy was rejected as a source by Klaus Kropfinger in his Urtext edition. Instead he used as his main source a copy of the score examined by the composer himself and located at the Austrian National Library in Vienna. To help solve many problems found in this copy an impression of the proofs of the piano version (originally published as op. 24) also corrected by Beethoven was consulted along with the original edition of the orchestral parts.

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