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17651058
17651058
17651058

Kizuna

By Frederick Speck

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Concert band (Piccolo, Flute 1, Flute 2, Oboe 1, Oboe 2/English Horn, Bassoon 1, Bassoon 2, Bb Clarinet 1, Bb Clarinet 2, Bb Clarinet 3, Bass Clarinet, Contralto Clarinet in Eb, Alto Saxophone 1/2, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Bb Trumpet 1, Bb Trumpet 2, Bb Tru) - grade 4
Composed by Frederick Speck. Band Music. Score and parts. Duration 10:00. Published by C. Alan Publications (CN.11810).

Item Number: CN.11810

Kizuna is a Japanese word which describes a connection between people that results in the creation of a strong bond. The work unfolds through solo passages that allow individual personalities to emerge, while developing a strong sense of physicality via several notable tutti sections, the strongest of which concludes the work. The music commingles eastern and western nuances in tonal languages that freely embrace one another.

Kizuna was commissioned by Dennis Johnson, president of the World Association for Symphonic Bands and Ensembles for premiere performance by the Senzoku Gakuen College of Music Wind Ensemble (JAPAN) at the 2005 WASBE Conference in Singapore. Since the theme of the conference focused on the artistic confluence of eastern and western aesthetics, this idea became central to the expression of the work. As a result, the music commingles eastern and western nuances in tonal languages that freely embrace one another. Though much of the work unfolds through solo passages that allow individual personalities to emerge, the music also develops a strong sense of physicality via several notable tutti sections, the strongest of which concludes the work. This process of joining together and gaining strength is reflected in the title, Kizuna, a Japanese word which describes a connection between people that results in the creation of a strong bond. It is derived from the roots 'ki' which means trees and 'zuna' or 'tsuna' which means ropes.