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1720376
1720376
1720376

Complete Book of Harmony, Theory & Voicing

By Bret Willmott

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http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/complete-book-of-harmony-theory-voicing-sheet-music/1720376?ac=1

Guitar (all) - Intermediate-Advanced
Composed by Bret Willmott. Perfect binding, Theory & Harmony. Complete. All Styles. Book. Published by Mel Bay Publications, Inc (MB.95112).

Item Number: MB.95112

ISBN 9781562229948. 8.75 x 11.75 inches.

This is a very comprehensive text that combines theory, harmony and voicing material with emphasis placed on voice leading. Although this book's primary focus is on four-note chord voicings on the middle strings of the guitar, much of the knowledge conveyed here can be appreciated and used by all jazz musicians, not only guitarists. Topics covered include: Tensions, Voice Leading Chord Scales, Enharmonic Chordal Substitutions, Fourth Voicings, Chromatic Guide Lines, Triad Over Bass Voicings, and much more! The best part of this book, however, is the unique and practical way the author takes modern harmonic concepts and shows you how to apply them in real music situations! Written for the intermediate to advanced music theory enthusiast who wishes to master this facet of music.

  • Introduction 
  • Drop 2 type voicings 
  • 1. Construction of "drop 2" inversions on the middle four strings of the guitar. 
  • 2. Construction of the various four-part chords (6th and 7th chords) through chord spelling. 
  • 3. Drop 2 inversion notation or "voice leading." 
  • Voice leading 
  • - Included are various voice-led line patterns. 
  • Voicing Considerations 
  • - Rules and considerations governing various voicing possibilities. 
  • - Included are "Low Interval Limits." 
  • Chord Symbol Notation 
  • - Problems and suggested solutions to chord symbology 
  • Tensions 
  • 1. Theory governing tension selections including tension addition chart 
  • 2. Voicing formulas for tension additions and substitutions to basic four-part structures. 
  • 3. Incomplete structures formed by tension additions and substitutions. 
  • Dominant Substitute V7 Chords 
  • Tension 9 
  • 1. Enharmonic chordal substitutions produced by the addition of tension 9 to a four-part harmonic structure. 
  • 2. Introduction of non-drop 2 type voicings; 9th(no5) or 9th(no3) chords. 
  • 3. 9th chords presented in various II - V - I examples. 
  • 4. Tension 9 additions by string 
  • 5. 9th chords presented in extended musical examples. 
  • Tension 11 
  • 1. Enharmonic chordal substitutions produced by the addition of tension 11 to a four-part harmonic structure. 
  • 2. 11th chords presented in various II - V - I examples. 
  • 3. 11th chords presented in extended musical examples. 
  • Tension 13 
  • 1. 13th (and 6th) chords presented in various II - V - I examples. 
  • 2. 13th chords presented in extended musical examples 
  • Two Tensions 
  • - Tensions 9 and 13 
  • Theory / II - V - I examples / extended musical examples 
  • - Tensions 9 and 11 
  • - Tensions 11 and 13 
  • Voice-leading Chord Scales 
  • Three Tensions (9, 11, and 13) 
  • - Theory / II - V - I examples / extended musical examples 
  • Altered 9th Tensions (Flat 9 and Sharp 9) on Dom. 7th Chords 
  • Enharmonic Chordal Substitutions 
  • - An organized approach to the enharmonic realizations of the various chords presented in the tension addition chapters. 
  • Additional Enharmonic Chordal Substitutions 
  • - New enharmonic possibilities of chords already presented. 
  • - Included at the end of this chapter is a list of the "incomplete" dominant-Sub V chords that were produced by their "Sub V" relation to the original dominant chords presented in the tension chapters. 
  • Relative Major - Minor 
  • 1. Examination of the relative major, minor, or minor 7 Flat 5 of selected chords. 
  • 2. Newly discovered chords and functions are listed and presented in various II - V - I examples. 
  • Additional Substitutions in II - V - I examples 
  • - The remaining new chordal discoveries from the "Additional Enharmonic Chordal Substitutions" chapter are presented in various II - V - I examples. 
  • New Voicings 
  • - Completes the available voicings within this text's established framework on the middle four strings. 
  • Enharmonic Substitutions on 9th Chords with omitted third or fifth 
  • - Examination of the various functions in these non-drop 2 type voicings 
  • Tension Additions on Diminished 7th Chords 
  • - Symmetrical and diatonic approach to the addition of tensions on diminished chords and examination of various functions. 
  • Constant Structure Harmonic Motion 
  • 1. Multi-function examination of a single voicing and chord type 
  • 2. Musical examples including II - V - I situations. 
  • Symmetrical Dominant Substitutions 
  • - Dominant functions of whole-tone and diminished are examined. 
  • Altered Dominant 
  • - Examination of harmonies derived from the "altered" scale; 1 Flat 2 Sharp 2 3 Flat 5 Sharp 5 Flat 7. 
  • Approach Voicings 
  • - In depth examination of chromatic, diatonic, and dominant approach techniques relative to four-note voicings. 
  • Fourth Voicings 
  • 1. Modal and diatonic approaches to quartal harmony. 
  • 2. Examination of various scales for their quartal harmonic potential. 
  • 3. 32-bar song form demonstrating the various uses of fourth voicings. 
  • 4. Different functions of fourth voicings derived from the Pentatonic scale 
  • Chromatic Guidelines 
  • - Examination of chromatic motion in each voice or voices of four-part harmonic structures. 
  • - Various parallel and/or contrary chromatic motion combinations are superimposed over different string combinations. 
  • 1. Chromatic guidelines over a single chord: 
  • one line / two lines / three and four lines 
  • 2. Chromatic guidelines over chord changes: 
  • 3. Contrary motion: various contrary chromatic combinations are presented in II - V - I examples and some extended chord progressions. 
  • Triad over Bass Voicings 
  • 1. Organization of major and minor triads over various bass notes. 
  • 2. Enharmonic possibilities of each structure. 
  • 3. "Upper-structure triads" - triads over different 7th and 6th chords. 
  • 4. Triads over tensions 
  • 5. Triads over bass arpeggios 
  • 6. Symmetrical motion 
  • 7. Diatonic motion 
  • 8. Contrary motion 
  • 9. "Unavailable" half-steps 
  • 10. Doublings 
  • 11. Reharmonization 
  • Song Examples 
  • - A combination of the voicing techniques and substitutions presented in this text will be used to reharmonize various chord progressions found in different songs. 
  • Rhythm 
  • 1. Various rhythms and chord omissions (rests) are suggested to be used over the existing examples throughout this text. 
  • 2. Different rhythms and string combinations are examined. 
  • Conclusion 
  • - Suggestions for continued harmonic study including different voicing sizes and string combinations 
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